Shocking Indiana Drunk Driving Accidents and Lawsuits – Summer 2013

Drunk driving accidents in Indiana unfortunately continue to attract a great deal of attention, as both the extent of depravity and negligence of the driver is matched on the opposite side of the spectrum only by the degree to which these accidents are really very preventable and foreseeable. Drunk driving campaigns have promulgated advertisements through schools, bars, on commercials, and onto billboards. Yet each summer in Indiana we see an uptick of crashes caused by intoxicated drivers. crash-car-1-748020-m.jpg

One incident in particular, which involved negligence and recklessness, occurred in June so details are still currently emerging. Mr. Grskovich, of Indianapolis, crashed his BMW into a stone wall while driving with a blood alcohol content of .17, which is over twice the legal limit (.08). What has been revealed was that Grskovich was driving with an eight year old blind child on his lap at the time of the accident, allowing the child to operate the pedals of the car. The boy suffered lacerations, and Grskovich is currently wheelchair-bound after two broken legs.

History almost repeated itself this month when a Vincennes man was pulled over for speeding. The Indiana State Police at the scene detected the smell of alcohol on him and learned the man had been driving drunk with both a case of beer in the backseat and his nine year old grandson. Fortunately, the police arrested the man and no one was injured.

It is important to remember that, despite the obvious recklessness of these examples, drunk driving can often end in lethal consequences. The Schulte family of Indiana had just moved to their new home in Seattle when tragedy struck. Dennis, a retired teacher and coach, and Judy, a teacher who led campaigns against drunk driving, were struck and killed by a drunk driver, and their pregnant daughter-in-law was severely injured.

Their deaths have led to a massive $45 million claim being filed against the city of Seattle for its failures to supervise the driver and thereby prevent such a foreseeable accident. Mark Mullan, the drunk driver, had five DUI arrests prior to his truck crashing into the Schulte family, and at the time of the accident was on probation and should have been driving with an interlock device. The lawyers for the Schultes will argue that but for the city’s failure to monitor and supervise Mullan, the family would be alive today.

Drunk driving is a serious threat to everyone’s safety, driver or pedestrian. Injuries from accidents involving intoxicated drivers run the gamut from minor to deadly and the success of the ensuing lawsuit is oftentimes the only redress for getting the justice and compensation to stave off excessive medical costs, both short and long term. Suits may be filed whether you or your property is hit by a drunk driver or whether the drunk driver incurs liability in another fashion. In the above cases, both drivers may face liability for the dangers and harms they exposed the innocent children to that they were supposed to be taking care of. Mullan, the Seattle driver, will face criminal and civil liability for his choices but other relevant parties, like the city, could also be held responsible. Two of the most important parts of finding justice and compensation in an intoxicated driver case is locating all responsible parties and finding and maintaining evidence of the driver’s distracted or impaired condition at the time of the crash.

At the Indianapolis Personal Injury Law Firm of Parr Richey Obremskey Frandsen & Patterson, we focus on recovery so you can focus on healing. If you or a loved one has suffered as a result of a driver, whether due to intoxication or negligence, you may be eligible for compensation. Contact us today online or at (888) 532-7766 to schedule your free confidential consultation with one of our attorneys.

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